Request for Comment on Regulations for Summer Youth Camps

 BALTIMORE (September 13, 2012) – The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH) is requesting informal comments from the public on proposed changes to regulations for summer youth camps.  The Maryland Youth Camp Act (Health-General Article, §§14 401—14-411, Annotated Code of Maryland) and Code of Maryland Regulations (COMAR) 10.16.06 establish the regulatory framework for summer youth camps.  The Department is proposing to look at the following questions:

 

1.      Should there be a change in the frequency of inspections for camps, based on their health and safety experience, inspection history, and risk?

2.      Should camps that have affiliations with national accrediting organizations be exempted from certain requirements of the Youth Camp Act and associated regulations? 

3.      Should camps of a certain size be required to have health professionals on staff? 

4.      Should there be changes in medication administration rules for certain types of medications?

5.      Should there be new requirements for youth camps in the response to and reporting of certain illnesses and injuries, including concussions? 

6.      Should camps be allowed to use electronic medical records?

7.      Should immunization history requirements be the same for residential as for day camps?

 

For more information, visit http://dhmh.maryland.gov/SitePages/request%20for%20informal%20comment.aspx.

 

Written comments should be submitted by Friday, September 21, 2012.  The Secretary has asked the Youth Camps Safety Advisory Council to review comments and to make recommendations on whether the Department should take any additional action.  In addition to reviewing written comments, the Council will hold a public meeting to solicit additional public input on the questions above on October 10, 2012, at 7178 Columbia Gateway Drive, Columbia, MD 21046.   The Council will then vote on recommendations to forward to the Secretary of Health and Mental Hygiene.  

 

Comments may be submitted by mail to Michele Phinney, Director, Office of Regulation and Policy Coordination, Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 201 W. Preston St., Room 512, Baltimore, MD 21201, email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or by fax to 410-767-6483

 

 

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