DHMH Advises Marylanders Not to Consume Trader Joe’s Valencia Creamy Salted Peanut Butter

(Baltimore) September 21, 2012 -- The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH) is currently advising consumers not to consume or purchase Trader Joe’s brand Valencia Creamy Salted Peanut Butter made with sea salt because of a potential link to a Salmonella outbreak. Other Trader Joe’s brand peanut butter products may also be affected. Out of an abundance of caution, consumers should consider setting aside and not consuming all Trader Joe’s brand peanut butter products while the investigation continues.



DHMH is working with several state health departments, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to investigate a multi-state outbreak of Salmonella Bredeney infection. Maryland has one associated case, a child (under 18 years old), who was not hospitalized and has recovered. Some affected individuals in other states have been hospitalized.

Consumers should be aware that these products may also be available in stores and online via various shopping websites. DHMH will update the public on the progress of this investigation as information becomes available.

Symptoms of Salmonella infection included diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps 6 to 72 hours after infection. The illness usually lasts 2 to 7 days, and most persons recover without treatment. However, in some cases, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient requires hospitalization. Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the bloodstream and then to other body sites and can cause death unless the person is treated promptly with antibiotics. Older adults, infants, and those with impaired immune systems are more likely to have a severe illness from Salmonella infection. Anyone with these symptoms who has consumed Trader Joe’s brand Valencia Creamy Salted Peanut Butter made with sea salt should consult their health care provider.

More information about salmonellosis can be found at the DHMH website
http://ideha.dhmh.maryland.gov/SitePages/salmonellosis.aspx.




 

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