Give yourself the gift of health this holiday season

Holiday cheer isn’t the only thing that’s contagious this time of year. Winter months are prime time for the spread of colds and flu viruses. 

 

The Worcester County Health Department encourages residents to give themselves the gift of health this holiday by getting flu shots. The health department is promoting flu vaccination as part of National Influenza Vaccination Week December 2-8.

 

“Many people think it’s too late to get a flu shot after Thanksgiving, but it’s actually the best time,” said Health Officer Debbie Goeller. “A flu shot is a gift you can give yourself and your family. It can give you the peace of mind that you will not be sidelined by the flu illness during the holidays.”

 

Each year the flu poses serious health risks for thousands of Americans. Flu season generally peaks between January and March. Vaccination is the first and most important step in protecting against the flu.  The vaccine is available at the health department’s Snow Hill, Berlin and Pocomoke offices.  To make an appointment, call our office. The Snow Hill number is 410-632-1100; Berlin is 410-629-0164; Pocomoke is 410-957-2005.

 

Flu vaccine is $15 for self pay clients. Medicare is billed when cards are presented. No one will be denied service due to inability to pay.

 

This year’s vaccine provides protection against three strains of flu virus expected to circulate this season. Two of the strains are different from the 2011 vaccine. Last year’s vaccine will not protect against this year’s flu viruses. All people including pregnant women and those with medical conditions are strongly recommended to get a flu vaccine each year.

 

People age 65 years and older who visit the Worcester County Health Department have the choice of receiving a high dose flu vaccine which will result in a stronger immune response against the flu. 

 

For more information visit the Worcester County Health Department‘s website at http://worcesterhealth.org, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..  

 

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 Lower Shore Health Insurance Assistance Program