Rabies Exposures

 

(click on the brochure below to learn more)

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 • If you see a wild animal, such as a raccoon, skunk, fox, groundhog, opossum, or a feral cat behaving in a  threatening or obviously sick manner or should your pet be involved in an altercation with one of those animals –  REPORT IMMEDIATELY to your local police department or Sheriff’s office. 
 
  • Prevent further contact by keeping pets and people away.  If a pet or person has already had contact, it is  important that the rabies suspect animal be obtained (safely) for rabies testing. 
 
  • If a pet has had contact, DO NOT TOUCH the pet barehanded. Make sure the Health Department is contacted  for further instructions, if contact has occurred.  Your pet’s veterinarian may also be contacted for further advice.
 
 

 

Bats and Rabies

 

People usually know when they have been bitten by a bat. However, because bats have small teeth which may leave marks that are not easily seen, there are situations in which you should seek medical advice even in the absence of an obvious bite wound.

• If you find a bat in the living space of your home, and do not know when or how it got in, contact our Office immediately for a risk assessment at 410-641-9559 and do not release the bat. After hours, contact your local police department or dial 410-632-1311 for further assistance.

• For assistance with bat colonies not inside the living area of the home (attics, eves) contact Maryland Department of Natural Resources Wildlife and Heritage Service call   1-877-463-6497 or visit their website at: www.dnr.md.us

• To learn more about the dangers of exposure to bats and rabies, visit: www.cdc.gov

(click on the brochure below to learn more)

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Confirmed Rabid Animals in Worcester


While raccoons make up the vast majority of confirmed rabid animals in Worcester County (and in Maryland), other species are also infected. Many people are not aware that the most frequent domestic animals to contract rabies are cats. 

Year
 Total Confirmed
 Species
2018
1
  1 raccoon 
2017
10
  8 raccoons, 1 opossum, 1 cat
2016
14
 11 raccoons, 1 skunk, 1 cat, 1 groundhog 
2015
12
 12 raccoons
2014
23
 18 raccoons, 1 fox, 1 bat, 2 cats, 1 skunk
2013
46
 40 raccoons, 3 foxes, 1 groundhog, 1 bat, 1 dog
2012
19
 16 raccoons, 2 foxes, 1 groundhog
2011
16
 11 raccoons, 2 skunks, 2 groundhogs, 1 cat
2010
26
 18 raccoons, 6 foxes, 2 cats
2009
52
 45 raccoons, 5 foxes, 1 opossum, 1 cat



Many of these confirmed rabid animals, as well as many other suspect animals that were unable to be tested, had contact with pets or people. It is extremely important that pets' rabies vaccinations stay current and that these encounters are reported so that testing and proper rabies risk assessments can be made for the people and pets involved.

  • For a line by line listing of confirmed and suspect rabies investigations for 2018, click here.
  • For a line by line listing of confirmed and suspect rabies investigations for 2017, click here.
  • Worcester County map of Laboratory Confirmed Rabid Animals found 2017, click here.
  • For a line by line listing of confirmed and suspect rabies investigations for 2016, click here.
  • For a line by line listing of confirmed and suspect rabies investigations for 2015, click here.
  • For a line by line listing of laboratory confirmed positive rabies cases and suspect positve rabies investigations for 2014, click here.
  • Worcester County map of Laboratory Confirmed Rabid Animals found 2011-2016, click here.
  • For a line by line listing of laboratory confirmed positive rabies cases and suspect positive rabies investigations for 2013, click here.
  • For more information about rabies in Maryland, visit www.dhmh.maryland.gov

 

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Rabies Clinics



• Maryland and Worcester County laws require current rabies vaccinations for all cats, dogs and ferrets four months and older. Rabies vaccinations         (shots) are available at any veterinary clinic and should be a part of your pet's routine health care.
 

• The Worcester County Health Department together with Worcester County Animal Control offers rabies clinics throughout the county. 
 

• The next clinics will  be in the spring of 2018. You may call Animal Control at 410-632-1340 or our office at  410-641-9559 for updated information.

 

 

• The cost per pet is $5 for Worcester County residents and $10 per pet for non residents. Please bring proof of residency. Dogs must be on leashes and under the control of an adult. Cats and ferrets must be in carriers with air holes. In order to receive a 3 year booster shot you must bring your pet’s previous vaccination certificate.
 

 
This information is provided by the Environmental Health Program.

 

 

 

 

 

Substance Abuse Help

 

Zika Information

 

Rabies Information


     

WCHD News

 

Snow Hill, MD–The Worcester County Drug and Alcohol Abuse Council is seeking nominations of individual adults, youth, or groups who have made outstanding contributions to drug and alcohol prevention or treatment. The awardees will be honored by Worcester County residents, elected officials, and council members at the 27th Annual Drug and Alcohol Awards Reception and celebrating the 35th year of the Council’s existence. This will be held at 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, April 17 at the Worcester Career and Technology High School.

Read more ...

 

Fatalities related to intoxication down in Somerset, Worcester and Wicomico in 2017

Snow Hill, MD- Deaths related to drug and alcohol intoxication, including opioid overdoses, are down in Worcester, Wicomico and Somerset Counties, according to 3rd Quarter 2017 Overdose Data released by the Maryland Department of Health last week. From January through September 2016, compared to the same period in 2017, intoxication fatalities are down 20-percent in Somerset County, 42-percent in Worcester County, and 32-percent in Wicomico County. The drop-off in the Tri-County region comes at a time when overall drug and alcohol related deaths in Maryland are on the rise.

Read more ...

Public Education to Combat Statewide Opioid Epidemic

 Baltimore, MD (January 26, 2018) — The Maryland Department of Health today announced two multi-media advertising campaigns to help raise awareness and combat the state’s opioid epidemic.

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Proposed legislation, increased bed capacity, more positions will mitigate decade-long issue and improve care


Baltimore, MD (January 23, 2018) – The Maryland Department of Health today announced proposed departmental legislation, as well as administrative actions, to address longstanding systemic issues involving court-ordered placements for individuals requiring mental health treatment. The Department has worked diligently to reverse a nearly decade-long problem of backlogs for justice system-involved individuals who require court-ordered placement for mental illness treatment at its hospitals.

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Directs Attorney General to File Lawsuit Against Opioid Manufacturers; Announces Plans to Convert Former City Jail into a Secure Treatment Facility, Enhance Data Sharing Among First Responders, Strengthen Volume Dealer Law to Include Fentanyl

ANNAPOLIS, MD — Governor Larry Hogan and Lt. Governor Boyd Rutherford today unveiled a series of executive actions and proposed legislation to continue the administration’s aggressive fight against the heroin and opioid crisis. The governor also authorized the Attorney General to file suit against select opioid manufacturers and distributors on the grounds that they have misled the public and helped to create the addiction crisis gripping Maryland and the nation.

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