Decisions Matter PDF Print E-mail
 Decisions Matter: Opioid Awareness
Addiction is a Disease. Recovery is a Decision. Decisions Matter

Treatment is Available


If you or someone you know struggles with substance abuse, treatment is available locally.
Contact the Worcester Addictions Cooperative Services Center at 410-213-0202 for more information.

Watch the Addiction Recovery Public Awareness Video Below

  alt

Throw out expired medications
 
Most opioid abusers don’t begin with heroin and instead start by misusing prescription opioids like painkillers which may only require a trip to the family medicine cabinet. It is vital for parents and guardians to realize that even if their doctor prescribed it, an opioid can be dangerous and addictive if misused. Medicine cabinets need to be monitored and expired prescriptions disposed of safely. There are three medicine drop-boxes across Worcester at both the northern and southern ends of the county.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     
Naloxone Can Reverse Overdoses and Save Lives      
   
Worcester County Health Department offers Naloxone trainings for free to all interested community members across the county. Trainings are held at 6 p.m. the 4th Wednesday of every month at the Ocean Pines Library and offered in Snow Hill every 2nd and 4th Friday of the month. If you would like to attend a free Naloxone training or learn more, please call the Worcester County Health Department at 410-632-0056.
 
 
Know How to Spot the Signs of Addiction 

According to the National Council of Alcoholism and Drug Dependency, here are some of the most common indicators of drug abuse:
  • Eyes that are bloodshot or pupils that are smaller or larger than normal.
  • Frequent nosebleeds could be related to snorted drugs (meth or cocaine).
  • Changes in appetite or sleep patterns.  Sudden weight loss or weight gain.
  • Seizures without a history of epilepsy.
  • Deterioration in personal grooming or physical appearance.
  • Impaired coordination, injuries/accidents/bruises that they won’t or can’t tell you about-  they don’t know how they got hurt.
  • Unusual smells on breath, body, or clothing.
  • Shakes, tremors, incoherent or slurred speech, impaired or unstable coordination.
  • Behavioral signs of alcohol or drug abuse.
  • Skipping class, declining grades, getting in trouble at school.
  • Drop in attendance and performance at work--loss of interest in extracurricular activities, hobbies, sports or exercise--decreased motivation.
  • Complaints from co-workers, supervisors, teachers or classmates.
  • Missing money, valuables, prescription or prescription drugs, borrowing and stealing money.
  • Acting isolated, silent, withdrawn, engaging in secretive or suspicious behaviors.
  • Clashes with family values and beliefs.
  • Preoccupation with alcohol and drug-related lifestyle in music, clothing and posters.
  • Demanding more privacy, locking doors and avoiding eye contact.
  • Sudden change in relationships, friends, favorite hangouts, and hobbies.
  • Frequently getting into trouble (arguments, fights, accidents, illegal activities).
  • Using incense, perfume, air freshener to hide smell of smoke or drugs.
  • Using eyedrops to mask bloodshot eyes and dilated pupils.
  • Psychological warning signs of alcohol or drug abuse.
  • Unexplained, confusing change in personality and/or attitude.
  • Sudden mood changes, irritability, angry outbursts or laughing at nothing.
  • Periods of unusual hyperactivity or agitation.
  • Lack of motivation; inability to focus, appears lethargic or “spaced out.”
  • Appears fearful, withdrawn, anxious, or paranoid, with no apparent reason.

To learn more, visit NCADD

 
 
Opioids are powerful drugs.

Opioids are drugs that slow down the actions of the body, such as breathing and heartbeat. Opioids also affect the brain to increase pleasant feelings. 
 
People take opioids for medical reasons.

Doctors prescribe opioid medication to treat pain and sometimes for other health problems such as severe coughing. The medication comes in a pill, a liquid, or a wafer. It also comes in a patch worn on the skin. 
 
Examples of prescribed opioid medications include:

• Codeine—an ingredient in some cough syrups and in one Tylenol® product
• Hydrocodone—Vicodin®, Lortab®, or Lorcet®
• Oxycodone—Percocet®, OxyContin®, or Percodan®
• Hydromorphone—Dilaudid® • Morphine—MSContin®, MSIR®, Avinza®, or Kadian®
• Propoxyphene—Darvocet® or Darvon®
• Fentanyl—Duragesic®
• Methadone.
 
 
Heroin 

Heroin is an illegal, highly addictive drug processed from morphine, a naturally occurring substance extracted from the seed pod of certain varieties of poppy plants. Impure heroin is usually dissolved, diluted, and injected into the veins, muscles, or under the skin. A nationwide survey indicates that heroin users are attracted to the drug not only for the “high” but because it is less expensive and easier to get than prescription painkillers.


 
alt   alt

 

The Maryland Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) showed that 7.4-percent of 12th graders in Worcester County had used heroin. In appealing to youth, the task force will emphasize the loss of decision making that comes with dependence and the ease of slipping into addiction. Lives are being lost every year, often in their prime, due to a lack of understanding of the problem. In 2014 alone there were 14 accidental overdose deaths in Worcester County, up from 6 the year before. Heroin and prescription opioids make up the majority of those deaths across the state as of 2014.
 
Maryland DHMH Overdose Statistics
 
alt
 
Naloxone, also known as Narcan, is a medication that can be used to save a life in the event of an opiate overdose. The Health Department  offers Naloxone trainings for friends, family members and anyone that might come in contact with an opioid abuser. For more information on trainings call 410-213-0202. 

 

Need to Dispose of Expired Medications Safely? Find the Prescription Dropoff Box Closest to You by Clicking Below

 
 
 
alt
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Funding provided by Maryland BHA and SAMHSA.


 
 
Last Updated on Monday, 15 May 2017 08:03
 
 

Substance Abuse Help

 

Zika Information

 

Rabies Information


     

WCHD News

First Md. service honor named after Dr. Ulder Tillman awarded to Debbie Goeller. Worcester’s health officer has worked 25 years to improve Marylanders’ lives.
 
Baltimore, MD (June 26, 2017) – Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Deputy Secretary of Public Health Dr. Howard Haft has presented the first Dr. Ulder Tillman Commemorative Annual Award for Public Health Officers Community Service to Debbie Goeller. Worcester County’s health officer. Dr. Tillman served as Montgomery County’s health officer for 13 years, until her unexpected death in January. The award, titled, Dr. Ulder Tillman Commemorative Annual Award for Public Health Officers Community Service – Above and Beyond Duty, will be displayed in the department with successive winners’ names inscribed on it.

 
Read more...
 
Lifesaving Overdose Reversal Drug Now More Easily Available in Maryland Pharmacies
 
ANNAPOLIS, MD — The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene recently announced that Dr. Howard Haft, the agency’s Deputy Secretary for Public Health, issued a new statewide standing order that allows pharmacies to dispense naloxone, the non-addictive lifesaving drug that can reverse an opioid overdose, to all Maryland citizens. The order follows legislation passed by the Maryland General Assembly and signed into law by Governor Larry Hogan that included a Hogan administration proposal to enable all citizens to access naloxone. Previously, naloxone was available only to those trained and certified under the Maryland Overdose Response Program.
Read more...
 
U.S., state remove Hagerstown nursing home from Medicare, Medicaid. Health and Mental Hygiene taking steps to protect welfare of Md. residents.
 
Baltimore, MD (June 7, 2017) – The U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene have terminated NMS Healthcare of Hagerstown LLC from the lists of providers authorized to serve Medicare and Medicaid consumers.  
Read more...
 
 Lower Shore Health Insurance Assistance Program
Web Mastering by
 www.WheatleyComputers.com